3 Great Venture Capital Books

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With so many innovative and creative business ideas, people are turning to entrepreneurship and taking it into their own hands to start these companies. However, in order to run a company, it needs funding to grow, which is often where venture capital comes in.

 

Venture capitalists want to make a smart investment, too, in order to come back with significant returns. If you’re new to venture capital and looking to make the right business decisions, or are simply interested in the subject, here are a few helpful books to check out:

 

Venture Deals by Brad Feld and Jason Mendelson

Feld and Mendelson thoroughly explain what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur in plain terms, as well as breaks down common venture capital terms in language that both the average person and a professional can understand. This book offers a very balanced perspective on venture capital and the strategies that entrepreneurs should utilize to achieve funding, while also helping avoid potential mistakes that startups often make. Venture Deals is also a great read for attorneys looking to practice law within the realm of venture capital and start-ups, as it provides a general overview of all roles involved and overall structure.

 

The Art of Startup Fundraising by Alejandro Cremades

Cremades spares no details as he delves into how technology and new regulations have changed the startup industry, and furthermore, what those changes mean for the entrepreneurs starting their businesses in the midst of them. For those who haven’t gotten very far in utilizing online startup funding, this book answers all of your questions and eases your fears. The Art of Startup Fundraising also speaks to the value of good funding, and guides the reader on identifying the right investors. It’s up-to-date information and works well as a one-stop guide for digital fundraising.

 

The Entrepreneurial Bible to Venture Capital by Andrew Romans

Andrew Romans use his personal experience in the startup industry to provide readers with insight available solely to insiders. Rather than provide advice to the venture capitalist seeking funding, The Entrepreneurial Bible covers a great many concepts, such as angel investing and crowdfunding, and explains how those terms interact with the more complicated terminologies. Between the real-life examples and conversational tone, Romans’ book serves as an excellent introduction for the curious reader to the vast and complex world of venture capital. Professionals, too, who are well-versed in the field, might consider adding a copy to their shelves, if only to use as a reference tool.

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